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HD over IP – Cablesson HDelity HDMI over IP Gigabit

                                                      
The Technology

Standard HDMI devices transmit video and audio using a signaling method called TMDS (Transition Minimized Differential Signaling). TMDS was designed for short cable runs, like those necessary to connect a cable box to an HDTV in an entertainment center. Unfortunately, TMDS has some limitations. Very high frequencey signals like HDMI tend to “drop off” as cable runs get longer, ultimately reaching a point of failure when the destination device can no longer resolve the picture and audio data. Since differential pairs are used for each of the three colour channels and the separate clock channel, differences in individual wire lengths inside HDMI cables can cause timing errors and blank screens.

HDMI over IP technology taps into the benefits of Ethernet standards to overcome the inherent limitations of TMDS. Enabling totally reliable cable runs up to 75 metres long, easy splitting and distribution of signals, and robust signal integrity, Transmitting HDMI over IP networks redefines the possibilities for HDMI video distribution. Compliant with HDCP 2.0 specifications, this technology supports copy protection with 128-bit AES encryption and overcomes traditional key verification limitations, enabling very large system sizes while maintaining full HDCP compliance. And unlike first-generation Megabit implementations of IP technology, Cablesson HDelity HDMI over IP Gigabit infrastructure means picture quality that is virtually indistinguishable from the source, suitable for the most discerning viewer. Since the data looks like any other Ethernet traffic, a Managed Ethernet Switch can be used just the same by controlling the vLAN grouping settings on the network switch. Customers will be free and able to switch/change TVs with the receiver to acquire different video source video streaming easily. Multi-Casting groups will only be limited by the network switch, and will benefit customers that want to efficiently distribute multiple HDMI sources with High Quality Lossless 1080p video signal.

Affordability
When considering Home Automation, Smart Home, Multi-room Audio and Home Cinema, foremost in most peoples mind is the cost. Answering that question is very difficult as there are so many factors that influence cost, not least the size of the house and the number of rooms served. HDMI over IP has unlimited applications and it is easily integrated with different control systems. Despite having all the spectacular features you will be surprised when you check out its prices which are highly affordable. When you compare a HDMI Matrix switch with all of the devices needed to distribute the signal throughout the home, the HDMI over IP solution generally comes out as better value. Not to mention the frustration of wondering if the long HDMI cables or the finicky Baluns will work with the necessary cable distances. The HDMI over IP solution can extend a HDMI source much further than Baluns, and it is always reliable and consistent.
                                   
Flexibility
In our digital world, everyday we make new advancements in digital video compression making the audio and video signals to be carried over the typical network circuits such as the Internet, LAN and WAN. Any HDMI source can simultaneously be displayed on any number of display devices (if multiple displays are permitted by the HDMI source) using VLAN isolation on a Managed Ethernet Switch. The point to point or point to many projector enables you to send out an HDMI 1.3 signals to many LCD panels or one or more than one HDMI video projectors and return the source an IR control signal using cat 5/ cat 6/ or cat7 over a standard Ethernet infrastructure. HDMI over IP is used to distribute the high definition digital signals to hundred or more remote displays.
 
By using Cablesson HDelity HDMI over IP to distribute the high definition digital signals to one or hundred or more remote displays. The best part is that it maintains excellent quality of picture as well as sounds. These high speed connectors provide greater reliability and durability for a longer period of time. The functionality of an HDMI over IP is simple to understand. It simply encodes the digital data stream which is broadcasted. Afterwards it sends IP data packets and receives signals decoding them on 1080p. A usual HDMI over IP kit consists of a receiver and a transmitter. Each of such devices is allotted a specific IP address. You can get additional receivers for extra sum of money to distribute to additional displays.

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hdmi cable are the same, ok so we all are the same claims HDGuru

Being recently gone to Dixonxs in Oxford you can see HDMI cables online or in stores labeled “120 Hz,” “240Hz” and “480 Hz”? It’s easy enough to slap such labels on HDMI cables but it’s a sham. HDMI cables can no more be manufactured for specific refresh-rate HDTVs than a garden hose can be manufactured specifically to water seeded lawns and sod lawns. The same water flows through either one. The same HDTV signal flows through all HDMI cables, whether labeled “120Hz” or “480Hz” — or not labeled at all. In fact, a TV’s refresh rate has nothing whatsoever to do with the signal flowing to that set. The refresh rate is determined by the set’s circuitry once the signal gets there, so how can different HDMI cables be manufactured for different refresh-rate sets? The manager at the store claimed the HDMI Cables paid for the store to be opened, they made no money on the televisions they required accessories. Clearly the intent of the refresh-rate labeling is simply to confuse you into spending more money on HDMI cable than you need to. TV retailers, including Best Buy, use this new misleading labeling to push naïve customers into buying unnecessary, overpriced cables that can cost far more than necessary.

Adding such labels — the latest being “3-D” — helps sales clerks persuade customers to overspend. The extra dollars spent will have no effect on image quality but they will lighten your wallet. To view Blu-ray, Full HD 3-D content and any other source at the highest (1080p) resolution, you need HDMI cables. It is a single-wire solution that conducts a standard definition or high definition 2-D or 3-D video image and accompanying audio tracks from a source device to an HDTV. Only two types of HDMI cables are included in the HDMI licensing spec: “Standard” (aka category 1) or “High Speed” (aka category 2). The latter is required to assure the cable passes 1080p signals (including 3-D), which is the highest bandwidth video signal available now and for the foreseeable future. HDMI cable makers mislead consumers by mislabeling their step-up quality HDMI cables with the various refresh rates used by set makers to improve picture quality. Despite the fact that some labels indicate signals of 480Hz, the signal fed by an HDMI cable to a set never exceeds 60Hz. HDMI Licensing LLC licenses the design, specifications and requires labeling of cables as either “Standard” or “High Speed.” HDMI does not have any rules concerning additional labels, according to its spokesman. While the HDMI standard has been updated to include new optional functionality such as passing Ethernet network signal, there remains only two speed categories. Any “High Speed” HDMI cable should handle any display and any video signal you can throw at it. HDGuru visited a number of local TV dealers. Best Buy had the widest selection, offering “High Speed” HDMI cables from Monster, AudioQuest, Rocketfish (BB house brand) and Dynex (BB house brand). They all display labels that tout their own capabilities. The least expensive is a Dynex 4-foot “High Speed” cable and costs $29.99. The box says 1080p 60Hz. The first step-up is the 4-foot Rocketfish at $49.99, and the package reads 120Hz.

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Cablesson All purpose Mini HDMI cables for Digital Cameras and HD Camcorders

The Ivuna range of Mini-HDMI cables is the latest addition to the high end series of Cablesson products. The highly advanced design of this cable incorporates a special stress relief (SR) mechanism that permits the cable to bend with minimum stress on the HDMI port when connected horizontally or vertically. 

                                                         

Ivuna mini hdmi cable allows you the luxury of seeing and hearing every detail without any compromise. It delivers uncompressed 1080p/120 Hz high definition video with 12-bit deep colour, eight channels of 192/24 digital audio for ultimate 7.1 surround sound, and an integrated control channel – all in one cable. It also eliminates digital-to-analog conversion between your video sources and display for the most accurate high definition picture.

 This brand new series is structured to the highest standard with exclusive technology and construction for precise, high bandwidth signal transfer. Heavy gauge, multi stranded copper conductors maximize digital signal transfer for precision 1080p video reproduction with deep, extended colour. Its silver plated pure copper conductors ensure maximum conductivity and bandwidth. An advanced nitrogen gas injected di-electric with quad layer shielding corrects impedance variances to deliver maximum signal strength as well as improves accuracy while delivering the most enjoyable home theater experience.
 
We are so confident with our products that we are offering a 10 year warranty against any manufacturing defects.
 
Cablesson® Mini-HDMI cables are produced to provide pure digital signals without distortion or loss in signal. They are made with Mylar foil to provide the best insulation possible. Don’t settle for less when selecting your HDMI cables.

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The Smallest 1080p Media Player Amex Digital MP-501

Sitting right next to your big computer, or your big screen HDTV, you’ll probably already find some ridiculously small gadget. After all, even our memory is getting smaller. And while there may already be options out there for you to purchase in the whole HD media player market, this new one from Amex Digital definitely aches to take the “smallest” title. Its measurements are noteworthy in of themselves, but the features speak for themselves, just as loudly.

The MP-501 measures in at a minimal 175- x 128- x 15mm, and if you were to hold it in your hand, you probably wouldn’t even noticed its negligible 250 gram weigh-in. You can connect the MP-501 to a USB-connected device, which can then stream a plethora of video formats. But, if you’re more interested in the HD side of things, then you’ll be excited to know that it can output up to 1080p HD, thanks to an HDMI cable.

There’s even a mini-USB port on the back-side. So if you’re watching all those HD videos, you’d want to make sure that your media player can handle it. The MP-501 has an ARM Cortex A8 processor tucked away inside, And thankfully, it can play pretty much any file format available, as long as you don’t have any of that pesky Digital Rights Management (DRM) going on. Price wise, you’ll be looking at only $49, so that’s not bad at all.

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4×4 HDMI – Ethernet CAT 5X6 Matrix Router

This unique 4×4 HDMI Ethernet Matrix Router has user configurable outputs. Each of the outputs can be configured for either

  • HDMI cable connection OR 2) CAT 5/ 6 Cable Connection. The Ethernet CAT 5/6 Matrix Switch is a complete HD routing solution for whole home HDTV systems.
  • In addition, Infrared Extension allows I.R. signals to be sent from viewing area to the equipment room over CAT-5/6 Cables.
  • Ethernet cables and connectors are easily field terminated thus allowing installers to easily install the proper length cable needed for ultimate flexibility and eliminate logistics problems of having custom length HDMI cables.

The 4×4 HDMI Matrix features 4 HDMI inputs, 4 HDMI Outputs, RS-232 control and fits in a 1RU rack mount housing for professional installations.
The 4×4 HDMI / Ethernet CAT5-6 Matrix Switch supports 1080P HD resolutions.
HDMI is the latest standard for distributing High Definition Digital Video and Audio in high def displays for 2 reasons:

  • uncompressed digital format ensures the best picture quality and
  • HDMI allows content providers to ensure that their intellectual property is protected through HDCP.

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NEW IVUNA 1.4 HDMI CABLES released

The NEW v1.4 Ivuna Advanced High Speed range of HDMI cables is the latest addition to the high end series of Cablesson products. The highly advanced design of this cable incorporates a special stress relief (SR) mechanism that permits the cable to bend with minimum stress on the HDMI port when connected horizontally or vertically. A re-engineered profile allows the Ivuna to fit into tight conduits, while our signature grip has been added for quick and easy insertion and release.
 
Ivuna Advanced High Speed HDMI Cable with Ethernet allows you the luxury of seeing and hearing every detail without any compromise. It delivers uncompressed 1080p/120 Hz high definition video with up to 48-bit deep colour, eight channels of 192/24 digital audio for ultimate 7.1 surround sound, and an integrated control channel – all in one cable. It also eliminates digital-to-analog conversion between your video sources and display for the most accurate high definition picture.
                                                                   
This brand new series is structured to the highest standard with exclusive technology and construction for precise, high bandwidth signal transfer. Heavy gauge, multi stranded copper conductors maximize digital signal transfer of up 2160p video reproduction with deep, extended colour. Its silver plated pure copper conductors ensure maximum conductivity and bandwidth. An advanced nitrogen gas injected di-electric with quad layer shielding corrects impedance variances to deliver maximum signal strength as well as improves accuracy while delivering the most enjoyable home theater experience.
 
We are so confident with our products that we are offering a 10 year warranty against any manufacturing defects.
 
Cablesson® HDMI cables are produced to provide pure digital signals without distortion or loss in signal. They are made with Mylar foil to provide the best insulation possible. Don’t settle for less when selecting your HDMI cables.

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3d hdmi cable for the masses

Cable-TV operators and their suppliers are stepping slowly into the new era of stereo 3-D television, but it could take years before they can handle full high definition content.

Some cable networks are broadcasting handling a growing schedule of 3-D events while vendors test interim standards using firmware upgrades to support partial high def signals. Set-top boxes, TVs and back-end encoders will need a new generation of video and interface chips to carry stereo-3D broadcasts in full high definition.

“It’s coming in steps,” said David Grubb, chief technology officer at set-top maker Motorola Home. “First we’re making 3-D as compatible as possible with existing video infrastructure,” he said.

“We’ve worked in past year on sorting out agreements on 3-D formats, making the consumer experience easy so when they tune into a 3-D channel the TV automatically switches to right mode and presenting 2-D graphics like closed captions and program guides in 3-D space,” he said.

CableLabs, the R&D consortium of the cable-TV industry, expects to finish interoperability testing of its so-called frame-compatible approach in about six months. “We have lab prototypes of encoders and set-tops and we’ve seen end-to-end demos,” said David Broberg, vice president of consumer video technology at CableLabs.

The group released in early September its specification for encoding stereo 3-D signals. It defines metadata to let set-tops identify 3-D content and its format type and pass that information to a 3-D capable TV over an HDMI version 1.4a interface.

That capability will let TV’s automatically decode the signal. Today consumers need to manually select the correct 3-D mode on the TV after they tune into a 3-D channel.

Today CableLabs and HDMI 1.4a support three 3-D formats for packing signals for two eyes into one existing video channel—separate top and bottom formats for 720-progressive 60 Hz and 1080p 24 Hz signals and a side-by-side format for 1080-interlaced content. The result is a signal presented to the TV for decoding at something less than a full high definition resolution.

The metadata supplies information to a graphics engine about how to find and decode 2-D graphics data in the formats.

Some cable operators have already been supporting limited 3-D broadcasts in an ad hoc fashion while engineers are testing the interim frame-compatible solution. Cablevision carried the first 3-D broadcast in March—a live Rangers vs. Islanders hockey game from Madison Square Garden.

Since then other cable networks have aired 3-D broadcasts of the Masters golf tournament in April, the soccer World Cup in June and NASCAR races in July. Comcast is creating a video on demand library of stereo 3-D titles and ESPN will begin weekly 3-D broadcasts this fall, said Broberg.

“I still consider it kind of an experimental, early-adopter stage–the number of people who buy these 3-D sets is small and the number who understand how to use them is even smaller,” said Broberg. “When we get to 24×7 3-D broadcasts is hard to say, but I suspect when it happens there will be a lot of repetition in programming,” he said.

Next-generation set-tops and encoders will have to adopt new video and interface chips to pass through full high definition versions of left and right eye video signals. The chips will require standards still being debated. We have seen a high number of cable manufactures releasing hdmi cabled for 3D, we can see a sell in the uk under the brand cablesson 3d 10m hdmi cable

“There are a number of proposals—some proprietary and some through standards groups like MPEG–for how to deal with a migration to full resolution delivery, but right now there are more questions than answers,” said Broberg.

For example, the MPEG multi-view coding specification could be used for high def 3-D. However, MVC was designed to support multiple camera angles, not stereo 3-D, and it might not be compatible with the interim so-called frame compatible spec.

Today’s 1080-progressive 24 Hz Blu-ray signals or 1280×720 video games at 60 Hz can max out the bit rate available on today’s fastest 150 MHz HDMI chips, said Broberg.

Supporting a full 1080p 60 Hz signal for left and right eyes in a 3-D broadcast would require 300 MHz HDMI chips.

“Silicon Image [a lead developer of HDMI chips] said that’s a couple years away,” said Broberg.

Meanwhile cable TV operators are using a variety of bit rates to support 3-D broadcasts depending on factors such as available bandwidth and whether the content is fast action. The broadcast services will not be as crisp as content from 3-D enabled Blu-ray players which use a frame-packing technique that can deliver a full HD signal for both eyes.

“There’s a lot of variable quality because we are at the very beginning of the learning curve,” said Broberg

Next-generation set-tops ultimately will need upgraded graphics to handle stereo-3D program guides. Developers are demonstrating such apps at trade shows, but they are a low priority

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Onkyo Multi room and 3d Receivers

Onkyo have outed a trio of new A/V receivers, complete with THX certification and all 3D-capable.  The Onkyo TX-NR1008, TX-NR808, and TX-NR708 each have an ethernet port for internet and home network connectivity, including DLNA streaming, and they also support Dolby® Pro Logic IIz and Audyssey DSX, the former offering extra height channels for improved ambience, the latter adding either height or width channels.

On the 7.2-channel TX-NR808 and TX-NR708 the extra channels replace the surround rear channels. Meanwhile, on the 9.2-channel TX-NR1008 they have dedicated extra ports.  There’s also multi-room audio, ranging from a single powered zone on the TX-NR708 all the way to simultaneous three-room audio (one of which can be 5.1 surround) on the TX-NR1008.

Pandora, Rhapsody, Audyssey MultEQ, iPod/iPhone-compliant USB ports and seven HDMI 1.4a ports round out the basic specs.  The Onkyo TX-NR708 and TX-NR808 will be available at the beginning of July with MRSPs of $899 and $1,099 respectively; the TX-NR1008 will ship at the end of July with an MRSP of $1,399.

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Bikes, Cars and now AV Yahama goes full force

Yamaha has announced a new line of AV receivers, Aventage, designed to put a greater focus on performance, with Yamaha claiming that the new models have been redesigned from the ground up. For those of you counting, Aventage is now the fourth separate line of Yamaha AV receivers, in addition to the existing RX-V, HTR, and NeoHD lines. Aventage consists of five new models–RX-A700 ($650 list), RX-A800 ($800), RX-A1000 ($1,100), RX-A2000 ($1,500), and the RX-A3000 ($1,900)–which will be released throughout August and September.

 
Yamaha’s low-end Aventage model, the RX-A700.

(Credit: Yamaha) In terms of features, the low-end RX-A700 doesn’t offer much that’s different from a standard midrange AV receiver, although its 27.56 pound weight hints at its beefier sonic capabilities. At the high-end, the RX-A3000 is loaded with features, including two HDMI outputs, eight HDMI inputs, built-in HD radio, networking capabilities, and HQV video processing. Yahama is fighting back to Onkyo domance in the market the units come with hdmi 1.4 technology allowing more punch for less.

Though there’s certainly a market for AV receivers with superior sound quality, we can’t help but be a little skeptical of some of the claims, such as, “the addition of a specially designed fifth foot to improve structural rigidity, reduce vibration, and improve sound.” On the other hand, the inclusion of the new HQV “Vida” video-processing chip in higher-end models is a good sign given our experience with HQV’s previous offerings, although with nearly all video sources using HDMI, video processing is less important than it used to be.

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Samsung the new APPLE

The rumor mills are at it again and this time they are not focusing on devices that they think will topple the iPad but on the iPad itself. According to the latest tablet PC news, Apple is working on a second generation iPad which it hopes to introduce to the market during Q4 of 2010. The samsung Galaxy S has taken over consumers who are sick and tired of Apples Network Issue with the 4G. Slowly accross europe we see huge numbers showing that customers are moving away from Apple and to Samsung. This can see samsung leading the market few quickly. Our reports from Netherlands also inform us that Philips is looking for partners to share its technology in the OLED market. Consumers are none to me more smarter then the americas who dont know the difference between apple and oranges. Rumor also has it that the new gen iPad will have display sizes of 5.6 and 7 inches. Further, the reports also point towards Apple going in for OLED screen in place of LCD display that is on the current generation iPads.

OLED screens are considered far superior than LCD displays, in that OLED screens are more capable of displaying deeper black levels (since they do not require a backlight source). Also, contrast ratios are higher for OLED display while the screen refresh rates are faster, too. And that’s not all, for OLEDs are thinner and lighter in comparison to LCDs.

A smaller iPad will be surely welcomed by consumers. These will be even more affordable than the base iPad. In fact, there are reports that Apple already placed orders with component makers based in Taiwan to supply the screens in the two sizes for the new iPads. The leading developers of OLED screens in the world, like Samsung or LG, are hardpressed to meet their own demands with their mobile gadgets and an order from Apple would further strain their resources. LG already is finding it hard to meet the demand for the LED display of the current iPad and is resorting to setting up a second production line to ease demand rush.

There have been reports of many e-readers deciding to close operations due to intense competition. The iPad is also considered to be a major cause of worry for the e-reader industry, and has already brought doom to many. Just think what a smaller iPad

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